lovesouthkorea:

Jjokjin Meori (쪽진 머리) is probably the most classic Korean hairstyle, since the hairdo can be seen to this day. Jjokjin meori was for married women, formed by first parting and holding down the front part of the hair and then tying the hair into a bun in the back of the neck.
The large pin that holds the bun together is called bi’nyeo (비녀). The material and the design for bi’nyeo significantly varied, and offered a point of style for traditional women. Bi’nyeo could be made with gold, silver, jade, wood, bamboo, animal bones, etc., and the design included symbols for phoenix, dragon, wild ducks, lotus flowers, etc. The size of the bi’nyeo can also vary significantly - some of the decorative bi’nyeos were as long as two feet. In addition to bi’nyeo, the bun can hold a number of other accessories.
lovesouthkorea:

Eo’yeo Meori (어여머리) was hair worn by women in the palace (signifies social status), by queens, other kings’ wives and queen mothers. It is made almost exclusively with wigs. Additional decoration (called tteoljam 떨잠) was added to create a more luxurious look.
lovesouthkorea:

Korean court dances, like the Buchaechum (fan dance) seen here, were traditionally performed at state functions in the Joseon era and were divided into 2 forms: Chinese derived and natively developed. Performed by a large number of specially trained dancers, these dances are rarely performed. However, The National Center for the Korean Traditional Performing Arts specializes in keeping the tradition alive. (Source)
online-fashion-trends:

Beauty by khoitran
geisha-kai:

Kotoha’s erikae by ONIHIDE on Flickr
online-fashion-trends:

Beauty by khoitran
ileftmyheartintokyo:

Koenji Awa Odori 2014 by balbo42 on Flickr.
This blog is devoted to Asian national costumes (East, South, Southeast Asia and Pacific). Enjoy.Flag Counter
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